About the Illustrations

David Beale

Dual spherical exclusion force field bits sharing space sequentially.The animations are done by Microsoft's free gif animator). I use Dassault's DraftSight for most 2D illustrations if they can be done in only 2D otherwise Dassault's SolidWorks Premium does 3D and 2D pictures such as the gold background image of tangential circles within circles (a type of fractal). The dwg package outputs SVGs, into Corel PaintShop Pro Ultimate x8 to get gifs, Irfanview batch to trim and make transparent. 256 colours make smooth transitions but I like 16 colours, for gifs, because the transitions cause movement effects which help remind about the idea that all oscillating force-field bits have the harmonics of the whole of Creation, to some infinitessimal amount above zero, with other harmonics enabling each particle, no matter how simple, to be unique in ways additional to no two particles being able to fully occupy the same place in space at the same time.

The table below is used for the spherical moving diagrams. I compared matching the diameters to the sine of the angle (0, 7.5, 15...) to squaring (after multiplying the sine value to make useable diameter sizes). I wanted to illustrate the idea of sharing multi-dimensional space concentrically and equally so as to form stable occupancy; and as one diminishes the other increases with the total (100% occupancy) remaining constant in all dimensions; so sine-squared times 10 is better than without first squaring sine. Also the latter shows a slightly more obvious change in size from 90degrees to 82.5. I believe the analog is better for squaring the diameter (sine) first; because the exclusion forces are proportional to 2D not the gravity quantity (cubic). The exclusion force has to work in all directions, so the inverse-square rule works. An earlier animation, purple, has two bits of force-field sharing 3D space and phased compatible enough to be forced together tangentially but not concentrically. The bits go away and come back, in 3D; between them occupying space with enough stability for the pair to be a part of larger patterns.

degrees sine x 100 0 to 90 sin x 100 90 to 0 degrees sum B+C sin-sqx10 zero to 90deg 90 to 0 100
0.0 0.000 100.000 90.0 100.000 0.000 100.000 100.000
7.5 13.053 99.144 82.5 112.197 1.704 98.296 100.000
15.0 25.882 96.593 75.0 122.474 6.699 93.301 100.000
22.5 38.268 92.388 67.5 130.656 14.645 85.355 100.000
30.0 50.000 86.603 60.0 136.603 25.000 75.000 100.000
37.5 60.876 79.335 52.5 140.211 37.059 62.941 100.000
45.0 70.711 70.711 45.0 141.421 50.000 50.000 100.000
52.5 79.335 60.876 37.5 140.211 62.941 37.059 100.000
60.0 86.603 50.000 30.0 136.603 75.000 25.000 100.000
67.5 92.388 38.268 22.5 130.656 85.355 14.645 100.000
75.0 96.593 25.882 15.0 122.474 93.301 6.699 100.000
82.5 99.144 9.000 7.5 108.144 98.296 1.704 100.000
90.0 100.000 0.000 0.0 100.000 100.000 0.000 100.000
=100*(SIN(RADIANS(An))) =(10*(SIN(RADIANS(An))))^2